Wow! You have hit everything right on the money here (no pun intended). Any time you want to work with people, build relationships, trust, etc. you have to know how the human mind works. This blog post does just that beautifully! Our imagination is powerful. Our problems need resolutions. Our stories are relational. Combining all of these elements together is impact full. Not just to bring in more revenue, but to just know you are making a difference in life of someone else. It’s just like what the great Zig Ziglar has taught for years. “You can get whatever you want in life if you are willing to help enough other people get whey they want.”

No, that's not a good idea. Different audiences will respond to different messages depending on their demographics, behaviors, experiences and so on. For example, if you're writing copy for a direct-mail piece that will be sent to prior customers, your messages should be very different from those that would appear in a mailing to prospects. One audience is already very familiar with your products and services, while the other has no prior experience to draw from. Clearly, the messages to both audiences must be different to achieve the maximum response rates possible.


They also have to deploy these skills in a variety of different scenarios, readily shifting between many different content types. They must meld their own abilities and style, your brand’s voice, the demands of the specific type of content written, the desires of the audience and the technical SEO requirements needed for search engine algorithms. All of this must be done simultaneously and with relative ease.
CopyPress pays out writing assignments per word, depending on individual campaigns. As a content writer, you’ll be assigned projects that you can accept or reject. An editor will review your work. Projects are typically blog posts in the 300- to 500-word range. While some reviews on Glassdoor suggest a net-90 payment window and low payment rates, other reviews note high work volume.
I loved the tips you shared in this article, Gregory. A lot of them I probably knew and I do utilize them in my everyday work, but I do it perhaps … a bit randomly. This article paints a clear, concise picture of what’s really important if you want to convice someone to do something via a compelling copy. I also realize that most of the stuff listed here works well when combined. For example, a story is a way to invoke memories, but crafting a good story probably requires verbs rather than adjectives, etc…
After you write your first round of copy, read it out loud. Also, have someone else read it to see if they understand the message and the call to action. As you edit, cut unnecessary words and consolidate ideas. See if you can get your text down to 30 to 50 percent of what you started with. Also, include bullet points and possibly subtitles to make it easy to read-and, more important, easy to scan--as most readers scan a page before deciding whether or not to read all the details.
I’m guilty of doing all of the above at one point or another. I think a lot of the time it’s the pressure to get up to a certain word count, whether for SEO purposes or because the employer has the idea that more content = better content. I think a lot of this fluff comes about from the quotas that are set. I know I run out of things to say when it comes to pots and pans.
Let's say you're using PPC as your primary means of generating leads for your business. You need more leads, and decide to bid on the term "infographic generator" for $2 a click. At the end of your month-long campaign, you generated 1,000 leads and spent $10,000. Not bad. But what about next month? You have to spend $10,000 again. And again. And again. That is, if you want the leads to keep coming. In other words, when you turn the faucet of money off, leads stop coming out. The same concept applies with list purchasing, tradeshow marketing -- anything where you don't own the property from which leads are generated. Now let's contrast that experience against, say, blogging.
×