I’m guilty of doing all of the above at one point or another. I think a lot of the time it’s the pressure to get up to a certain word count, whether for SEO purposes or because the employer has the idea that more content = better content. I think a lot of this fluff comes about from the quotas that are set. I know I run out of things to say when it comes to pots and pans.
When the marketing team starts to grow, who leads content marketing gets more interesting. With a team of three marketers, you can approach content marketing a couple ways. Either one person can own content marketing activities, while the other two own activities that align more with the middle- and bottom-of the funnel. Or, two people can own content marketing activities, while the third owns the rest.
Like Harry's, RXBAR is another company that has reaped the rewards of simple and concise copy. Previously, protein bars have been complex. Half of the ingredients you read on the back of them can't be pronounced. RXBAR decided to create a bar that was just that... a protein bar. They kept it simple and created killer copywriting to further highly this simplicity. How about that ending line? "No B.S."
Let's say you're using PPC as your primary means of generating leads for your business. You need more leads, and decide to bid on the term "infographic generator" for $2 a click. At the end of your month-long campaign, you generated 1,000 leads and spent $10,000. Not bad. But what about next month? You have to spend $10,000 again. And again. And again. That is, if you want the leads to keep coming. In other words, when you turn the faucet of money off, leads stop coming out. The same concept applies with list purchasing, tradeshow marketing -- anything where you don't own the property from which leads are generated. Now let's contrast that experience against, say, blogging.
Ad copy is a very specific type of content. It is designed to get the reader to respond or take action. In a standard sales setting, salespeople spend several minutes to several hours answering prospective customers' questions and addressing their concerns. Without this interaction, many of the customer’s objections would go unanswered. If a customer has unanswered objections, they will not buy the product or service.
hi Gregory, the way you have highlighted the use of “you” made me surprised for so far i was told use of “we” and “Our” were to increase the chances of a reader believing the statement, more often than when said “you”. For instance, “You always had such problems” is not always appealing to a reader, but “we always had such problems” was better trusted. Because by using “we” we get to become a part of the reading(clients) people.
In mid 2016, an Indian tea company (TE-A-ME) has delivered 6,000 tea bags[29] to Donald Trump and launched a video content on YouTube and Facebook. The video campaign received various awards including most creative PR stunt[30] in Southeast Asia after receiving 52000+ video shares, 3.1M video view in first 72-hour and hundreds of publication mentions (including Mashable, Quartz,[31] Indian Express,[32] Buzzfeed[33]) across 80+ countries.
Just ran into this blog post via LinkedIn and I’m soo glad I did! I mostly do social media and digital communications but I find that a lot of the that has to do with the ability to write in a way that gets people excited and willing to try a new product or share something with a brand. For that reason, I’ve been trying to learn as much as possible about copywriting. These tips are excellent! Some of these I’ve used frequently but verbs over adjectives is a new one for me. Thanks so much for sharing these!! 🙂
Use a newspaper article from a local publication or an online publication and break it down based on the upside triangle structure of a typical newspaper article. Does the article conform to the traditional structure or does it use a different structure or form? Does the writer seem credible and believable? Does the article use reputable sources and quotes to support any arguments in the article?
The key word here is “valuable.” It’s what changes this definition from one that could describe almost any form of advertising or marketing. You can tell if a piece of content is the sort that could be part of a content marketing campaign if people seek it out, if people want to consume it, rather than avoiding it. So was VW’s 2014 “Game Day” commercial, which has been viewed on YouTube almost 18 million times as of the writing of this post, an ad, or content marketing? The answer is it’s both, depending on how it’s received by each individual who is exposed to it. The same will apply to any piece of content marketing you create, depending on whether the recipient received value from it or not. Of course the goal is to provide as much value from your content marketing to as much of your target audience as possible. At this point, despite this definition and explanation, you’re probably still wondering what exactly content marketing is. We can get more clarity by considering a few examples.
Never, ever write anything without including a "CTA", as marketers call it. This could be as simple as "Buy Now" or "Click Here" on a website or at the bottom of a blog, or as subtle as "87% of dentists recommend..." which implies if the consumer took the same action, they would achieve the same result.  (Think about all those beer commercials that imply that you too can be like the most interesting man in the world if you just drink their brand).  Instruct the readers on what to do next, overtly or subtly. Lead them to the action you desire them to take.
Marketing copywriters prepare creative and persuasive copy to urge consumers to purchase a client's goods or services. Copy is used in several media vehicles, including television, print and radio. Prospective marketing copywriters should seek a bachelor's degree in communications, English, journalism, advertising or marketing. In addition, examples of previous writing or completion of an internship program can be beneficial. Marketing copywriters should also be knowledgeable about their employer's industry, services and/or product line.
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