To generate Dox-NIL iMNs, the Dox-NIL construct was integrated into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus of the control, C9+/−, and C9-ALS patient iPSC lines using CRISPR/Cas9 editing (gRNA sequence shown in Supplementary Table 4). Dox-NIL iMNs were generated by plating at ~25% confluency on matrigel coated plates and adding 1 μg/ml of doxycylin in N3 media +7.5 μM RepSox 1 day after plating. Mouse primary mixed glia were added to the cultures at day 6, and doxycyline was maintained throughout conversion. iMN cultures were harvested at day 17.
(a) Production of Hb9::RFP+ iMNs and survival tracking by time-lapse microscopy. (b-d) Survival of control (CTRL) and C9ORF72 patient (C9-ALS) iMNs with neurotrophic factors (b) or in excess glutamate (shown with iMNs from all lines in aggregate (b, c) or for each individual line separately (d)). For (b-d), n=50 iMNs per line for 2 control and 3 C9-ALS lines, iMNs quantified from 3 biologically independent iMN conversions per line. (e) iMNs at day 22 in excess glutamate. This experiment was repeated three times with similar results. (f-g) Survival of control and C9-ALS iMNs in excess glutamate with glutamate receptor antagonists (f) or without neurotrophic factors (g). For (f-g), n=50 iMNs per line for 2 control and 3 C9-ALS lines, iMNs quantified from 3 biologically independent iMN conversions per line. (h) Survival of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons in excess glutamate. n=50 iMNs per line for 2 control and 2 C9-ALS lines, iMNs quantified from 3 biologically independent iMN conversions per line. Except in (d), each trace includes neurons from at least 2 donors with the specified genotype; see full detail in Methods. Scale bar: 100 μm (e). All iMN survival experiments were analyzed by two-sided log-rank test, and statistical significance was calculated using the entire survival time course. iMN survival experiments in (b-g) were performed in a Nikon Biostation and experiments in (h) were performed in a Molecular Devices ImageExpress.
The tomb murals of the Eastern Wei Dynasty (534–550) in the Southern and Northern Dynasties Period (386–581) unearthed from Xiaomachang Village of Wuqiao County in 1958 depict the performances of handstands, plate spinning, deft horsemanship and so on. However, it was after the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368) that acrobatics of Wuqiao gained much reputation. Before that, acrobatics in Henan Province was much more influential. After the Yuan Dynasty was established, the capital was moved from Kaifeng of Henan to Beijing, and the acrobatics in Wuqiao of Hebei, which neighbors Beijing, began to prosper and was increasingly influential.
J.K.I. and P.A. are co-founders of Acurastem, Inc. P.A. is an employee of Icagen Corporation. J.K.I. and P.A. declare that they are bound by confidentiality agreements that prevent them from disclosing details of their financial interests in this work. S-J.L. is a founder of DRVision Technologies and T-Y.C. is an employee of DRVision Technologies. A.Z. and J.A.C. are co-founders of Verge Genomics and V.H-S., N.W., and T.G.B. are employees of Verge Genomics.
GCaMP6 was cloned into the pMXs-Dest-WRE retroviral vector and transduced into reprogramming cultures concurrently with the motor neuron factors. To assess GCaMP6 activity, 1.5 μm glutamate was added to iMN cultures and cells were imaged continuously for 2 minutes at 24 frames per second. GFP flashes were scored manually using the video recording. At least 3 different fields of view from three independent cultures, totalling 50–100 iMNs, were scored per condition.
To determine if Pikfyve inhibition rescues gain-of-function processes in vivo, we measured DPR levels in C9-BAC transgenic mice 58 with or without Apilimod treatment. Although it was not previously reported 58, we observed significantly higher levels of GR+ punctae in hippocampal neurons in C9-BAC mice than controls (Fig. 6j) using a previously-validated poly(GR) antibody 11. These data are consistent with findings in another published C9-BAC mouse model 14, suggesting that poly(GR) may be a common feature of C9-BAC mice. We also detected a low level of poly(GR) in neurons from control mice (Fig. 6j), which may be derived from other repeat regions or proteins with short poly(GR) sequences. Nevertheless, GR+ punctae levels were significantly higher in C9-BAC mouse neurons than in controls (Fig. 6j). Importantly, Apilimod treatment significantly reduced the number of GR+ punctae in hippocampal neurons in C9-BAC mice after 48 hrs (Fig. 6i, j). Therefore, small molecule inhibition of Pikfyve rescues both gain- and loss-of-function disease processes induced by C9ORF72 repeat expansion in vivo.

Human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and ALS patients were obtained from the NINDS Biorepository at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and reprogrammed into iPSCs as previously described using episomal vectors61. Briefly, mammalian expression vectors containing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, L-Myc, Lin28, and a p53 shRNA were introduced into the lymphocytes using the Adult Dermal Fibroblast Nucleofector™ Kit and Nucleofector™ 2b Device (Lonza) according to the manufacturer’s protocol. The cells were then cultured on mouse feeders until iPSC colonies appeared. The colonies were then expanded and maintained on Matrigel (BD) in mTeSR1 medium (Stem Cell Technologies).
To verify that PIKFYVE is the functional target of the inhibitor, we first confirmed PIKFYVE expression by qPCR in control and patient (n=3 patients) iMNs (Supplementary Fig. 15b). Next, we verified that YM201636 rescued C9ORF72 patient iMN survival in a dose-dependent manner (Supplementary Fig. 15c). We then asked if Apilimod, a structurally distinct PIKFYVE inhibitor, could rescue patient iMN survival 51(Fig. 6b). To verify target engagement by Apilimod in iPSC-derived motor neurons, we administered Apilimod for three hours and measured EEA1+ early endosome size. PIKFYVE inhibition increases PI3P levels, leading to increased recruitment of EEA1 to early endosomes, more homotypic early endosomal fusion, and larger EEA1+ early endosomes 54. As expected, Apilimod treatment increased EEA1+ endosome size in a dose-dependent manner, verifying target engagement in motor neurons (Supplementary Fig. 15d, e).
Live imaging of iMNs expressing a M6PR-GFP fusion protein that localizes to M6PR+ vesicles 44 confirmed that C9ORF72 patient and C9ORF72-deficient iMNs possess increased numbers of M6PR+ vesicle clusters, and that overexpression of C9ORF72 isoform A or B rescues this phenotype (Supplementary Fig. 9c-g and Supplementary Videos 5-9). Clusters did not disperse over the time course of the assay, suggesting that they are relatively stable and not in rapid flux (Supplementary Videos 5-9). In addition, M6PR+ puncta moved with a slower average speed in C9ORF72 patient and C9ORF72+/− iMNs than controls (Supplementary Fig. 9h, i). Thus, reduced C9ORF72 levels lead to fewer lysosomes in motor neurons in vitro and in vivo, and this may be due in part to altered trafficking of M6PR+ vesicles.
Therapeutic strategies in development for C9ORF72 ALS/FTD target gain-of-function mechanisms. These include ASOs 6–8 and small molecules 13 that disrupt RNA foci formation. However, these approaches have not fully rescued neurodegeneration in human patient-derived neurons 6–8,13, indicating that replacing C9ORF72 function or new therapeutic targets may be required.
To determine if patient iMN degeneration resulted from bona fide ALS disease processes specific for motor neurons, we measured the survival of induced dopaminergic neurons (iDAs) generated by expression of FoxA2, Lmx1a, Brn2, Ascl1, and Myt1l 29. These neurons expressed high levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, indicating they had established a key aspect of the dopamine synthesis pathway and were distinct from iMNs, which do not express this enzyme 24 (Supplementary Fig. 3m, n). Unlike iMN cultures, iDA cultures from C9ORF72 patients (n=2 patients) did not show reduced survival compared to controls (n=2 controls) in either glutamate treatment and neurotrophic factor withdrawal conditions (Fig. 1h and Supplementary Fig. 3o), indicating that the in vitro neurodegenerative phenotype elicited by the C9ORF72 mutation is selective for motor neurons.
The fabrication of composite cathode with boroxine ring for all-solid-polymer lithium cell was described. Composite polymer electrolyte (CPE) was applied between the lithium metal anode and the composite cathode in a coin-shaped cell in order to prepare the solid-polymer electrolyte cell. The CPE films were cast on a flat polytetrafluoroethylene vessel from an acetonitrile slurry containing BaTiO ... [Show full abstract]Read more
To determine if patient iMN degeneration resulted from bona fide ALS disease processes specific for motor neurons, we measured the survival of induced dopaminergic neurons (iDAs) generated by expression of FoxA2, Lmx1a, Brn2, Ascl1, and Myt1l 29. These neurons expressed high levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, indicating they had established a key aspect of the dopamine synthesis pathway and were distinct from iMNs, which do not express this enzyme 24 (Supplementary Fig. 3m, n). Unlike iMN cultures, iDA cultures from C9ORF72 patients (n=2 patients) did not show reduced survival compared to controls (n=2 controls) in either glutamate treatment and neurotrophic factor withdrawal conditions (Fig. 1h and Supplementary Fig. 3o), indicating that the in vitro neurodegenerative phenotype elicited by the C9ORF72 mutation is selective for motor neurons.
Yingxiao Shi,#1,2,3 Shaoyu Lin,#1,2,3 Kim A. Staats,1,2,3 Yichen Li,1,2,3 Wen-Hsuan Chang,1,2,3 Shu-Ting Hung,1,2,3 Eric Hendricks,1,2,3 Gabriel R. Linares,1,2,3 Yaoming Wang,3,4 Esther Y. Son,5 Xinmei Wen,6 Kassandra Kisler,3,4 Brent Wilkinson,3 Louise Menendez,1,2,3 Tohru Sugawara,1,2,3 Phillip Woolwine,1,2,3 Mickey Huang,1,2,3 Michael J. Cowan,1,2,3 Brandon Ge,1,2,3 Nicole Koutsodendris,1,2,3 Kaitlin P. Sandor,1,2,3 Jacob Komberg,1,2,3 Vamshidhar R. Vangoor,7 Ketharini Senthilkumar,7 Valerie Hennes,1,2,3 Carina Seah,1,2,3 Amy R. Nelson,3,4 Tze-Yuan Cheng,8 Shih-Jong J. Lee,8 Paul R. August,9 Jason A. Chen,10 Nicholas Wisniewski,10 Hanson-Smith Victor,10 T. Grant Belgard,10 Alice Zhang,10 Marcelo Coba,3,11 Chris Grunseich,12 Michael E. Ward,12 Leonard H. van den Berg,13 R. Jeroen Pasterkamp,7 Davide Trotti,6 Berislav V. Zlokovic,3,4 and Justin K. Ichida1,2,3,†
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