Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from iPSC-derived motor neurons on days 17–21 in culture in 6-well multielectrode chips (9 electrodes and 1 ground per well) using a MultiChannel Systems MEA-2100 multielectrode array (MEA) amplifier (ALA Scientific) with built-in heating elements set to 37°C. Cells were allowed to acclimate for 5 minutes after chips were placed into the MEA amplifier, and after glutamate addition (10 μM final concentration). For 1 μM Apilimod treatments, chips were incubated for 35 min in a humidified incubator in the presence of the particular drug, then returned to the MEA amplifier and acclimated for 5 min before beginning recordings. For each condition, recordings (5 min baseline, 10 min glutamate and/or drug, 40 kHz sampling rate) were filtered between 1–500 Hz, and average LFP frequency per well was determined using the accompanying MC Rack software.
To verify that PIKFYVE-dependent modulation of vesicle trafficking was responsible for rescuing C9ORF72 patient iMN survival, we tested the ability of a constitutively active RAB5 mutant to block C9ORF72 patient iMN degeneration. Active RAB5 recruits PI3-kinase to synthesize PI3P from PI and therefore, like PIKFYVE inhibition, increases PI3P levels 56. Constitutively active RAB5 did not improve control iMN survival (n=2 controls)(Supplementary Fig. 15k), but successfully rescued C9ORF72 patient iMN survival (n=3 patients)(Supplementary Fig. 15l). In constrast, dominant negative RAB5, wild-type RAB5, or constitutively active RAB7 did not rescue C9ORF72 patient iMN survival (n=1, 3, 3 patients, respectively)(Supplementary Fig. 14m-o).
“The Tale of the Curly-Bearded Guest” 231Studies Bian, Xiaoxuan . “Lun ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de zuozhe, zuonian ji zhengzhi beijing” , in Dongnan daxue xuebao. Vol. 3, 2005, pp. 93-98. Cai, Miaozhen . “Chongtu yu jueze — ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de renweu xingge suzao ji qi yihan” in Xingda renwen xuebao . Vol. 34, 2004, pp. 153-180. Zhang, Hong . “Du Guangting ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de liuchuan yu yingxiang” in Zhongguo daojiao, vol. 1, 1997, pp. 28-31. Liu, Zhiwei . “Gujin ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de yanjiu fansi” in Xibei daxue xuebao. Vol. 1, 2000. Sun, Yiping . Du Guangting pingzhuan. Nanjing: Nanjing daxue chubanshe, 2005. ___. “‘Qiu xu ke’ yu ‘Qiu ran ke’” in Zhongguo daojiao. vol. 6, 2005, pp. 14-17. Luo, Zhengming . Du Guangting daojiao xiaoshuo yanjiu . Chengdu: Bashu shushe, 2005. Wang, Meng’ou . “Qiuran ke yu Tang zhi chuangye chuangshuo” in Tangren xiaoshuo yanjiu siji. Taipei: Yiwen chubanshe, 1978, p. 254. Xu, Jiankun . “‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ jili jiegou xintan” in Donghai zhongwen xuebao . Vol. 11, 1994, pp. 61-72. Ye, Qingbing . “‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de xiezuo jiqiao” in Zhongguo gudian wenxue yanjiu congkan — Xiaoshuo zhi bu . Taipei: Juliu, 1977, pp. 167-79.
We thank the NINDS Biorepository at Coriell Institute for providing the following cell lines for this study: ND12133, ND03231, ND01751, ND11976, ND03719, ND00184, ND5280, ND06769, ND10689, ND12099, ND14954, ND08957, ND12100, and ND014587. We thank Helena Chui and Carol Miller at the University of Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and Neil Shneider at the Columbia University Medical Center for control and C9ORF72 patient tissue. We thank the Choi Family Therapeutic Screening Facility for chemical screening support and the Translational Imaging Center at USC for imaging support. We thank Max Koppers, Youri Adolfs, Christiaan van der Meer, and Mark Broekhoven for help with mouse breeding and kainate injection experiments. We thank Prof. Satoshi Waguri for providing the M6PR-GFP construct. We thank Christopher Buser for assistance with electron microscopy. We also thank Sam Alworth (DRVision Technologies, LLC), Katja Hebestreit, and Raj Bhatnagar (Verge Genomics), Bob Baloh, Jacqueline O’Rourke, Christopher Donnelly, Chang Tong, Andrew McMahon and Qing Liu-Michael for reagents, technical support, and discussions. E.Y.S. is a Walter V. and Idun Berry Postdoctoral Fellow. K.A.S. was supported in part by a Muscular Dystrophy Association Development Grant. L.M. was supported by NIH grant T32DC009975–04. This work was supported by NIH grants AG039452, AG023084, and NS034467 to B.V.Z. R.J.P. was supported by grants from ALS Foundation Netherlands (TOTALS), Epilepsiefonds (12–08, 15–05), and VICI grant Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This work was also supported by NIH grants R00NS077435 and R01NS097850, U.S. Department of Defense grant W81XWH-15–1-0187, and grants from the Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation, the Tau Consortium, the Frick Foundation for ALS Research, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the New York Stem Cell Foundation, the USC Keck School of Medicine Regenerative Medicine Initiative, the USC Broad Innovation Award, and the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute to J.K.I. J.K.I. is a New York Stem Cell Foundation-Robertson Investigator.
Given our observation that iMNs with reduced C9ORF72 levels are hypersensitive to DPR toxicity, we wondered if this might be due to a general disruption of protein turnover by DPRsHowever, PR50-GFP expression did not impair turnover of APP or Tau (Supplementary Fig. 14f, g and Supplementary Fig. 5l). Thus the neurotoxicity caused by DPRs that accumulate rapidly in C9-ALS motor neurons due to reduced C9ORF72 levels is not due to global disruption of protein turnover.

Practitioners of kung fu refer to two separate forms of personal force: Li (Traditional Chinese: 力) refers to the more elementary use of tangible physical (or "external") force, such as that produced by muscles. Neijing (Traditional Chinese:內勁) or Neigong (Traditional Chinese: 內功), in contrast, refer to "internal" forces produced via advanced mental control over psychic energy (the qi).
Primary chick myoblasts were dissected from D11 chick embryos and plated onto plastic dishes pre-coated with 0.1% gelatin. After 3 days of culture in muscle medium containing F10 (Life Technologies), 10% horse serum, 5% chicken serum (Life Technologies), 0.145 mg/ml CaCl2 (Sigma), and 2% Penicillin/Streptomycin, myoblasts were trypsinized and replated onto iMNs which were at days 15–18 post-transduction. The co-culture was maintained in neuronal medium containing DMEM/F12, 2% B27, 1% GlutaMax and 1% Penicillin/Streptomycin, supplemented with 10ng/ml BDNF, GDNF, and CNTF for 7 days in order to allow neuromuscular junctions to form. Videos were taken using Nikon Eclipse Tis microscope with NIS Element AR software. Light-stimulated contraction shown in Supplementary Figure 2j are representative of contraction observed in 2 biological replicates, with 5 contractile sites per replicate.
Consistent with previous studies 3,4,6–8, patient iMNs (n=5 patients) had reduced C9ORF72 expression compared to controls (n=3; Fig. 2a and Supplementary Fig. 4a, 5b). While previous studies have linked low C9ORF72 levels to changes in vesicle trafficking or autophagy 18,20,30–33, it remains unknown if loss of C9ORF72 protein directly contributes to degeneration. Thus, we re-expressed C9ORF72 (isoform A or B) in iMNs using a retroviral cassette (Supplementary Fig. 4b) and found that both isoforms rescued C9ORF72 patient iMN survival in response to glutamate treatment (n=3 patients Fig. 2b and Supplementary Fig. 4c). This effect was specific for C9ORF72 iMNs, as forced expression of C9ORF72 did not rescue SOD1A4V iMN survival (Fig. 2c), nor did it improve the survival of control iMNs (n=2 controls Fig. 2d and Supplementary Fig. 4d).
To verify that PIKFYVE-dependent modulation of vesicle trafficking was responsible for rescuing C9ORF72 patient iMN survival, we tested the ability of a constitutively active RAB5 mutant to block C9ORF72 patient iMN degeneration. Active RAB5 recruits PI3-kinase to synthesize PI3P from PI and therefore, like PIKFYVE inhibition, increases PI3P levels 56. Constitutively active RAB5 did not improve control iMN survival (n=2 controls)(Supplementary Fig. 15k), but successfully rescued C9ORF72 patient iMN survival (n=3 patients)(Supplementary Fig. 15l). In constrast, dominant negative RAB5, wild-type RAB5, or constitutively active RAB7 did not rescue C9ORF72 patient iMN survival (n=1, 3, 3 patients, respectively)(Supplementary Fig. 14m-o).
We anticipate three key implications of our findings: 1) ALS/FTD caused by the C9ORF72 repeat expansion requires both gain- and loss-of-function mechanisms, 2) increasing C9ORF72 activity in motor neurons should mitigate disease and provides a new therapeutic target, and 3) PIKFYVE inhibition and other approaches that modulate vesicle trafficking may ameliorate C9ORF72 disease processes in both neurons and myeloid cells. The fact that mutations in FIG4 cause ALS, epilepsy, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth 55 illustrates the broad implications of impaired vesicle trafficking within the CNS. The identification of targets that effectively modulate vesicle trafficking in neurons, glia, and myeloid cells could hold tremendous therapeutic value for C9ORF72 ALS/FTD and other CNS disorders.
Immunostaining revealed that C9ORF72+/− and C9ORF72−/− iMNs contained elevated levels of NMDA (NR1) and AMPA (GLUR1) receptors on neurites and dendritic spines compared to control iMNs under basal conditions (Fig. 4a, c, d and Supplementary Fig. 5b and 10a, c-e, g, h, j, k). In addition, control iMNs treated with C9ORF72-specific ASOs displayed increased numbers of NMDA and AMPA receptors in their neurites (Supplementary Fig. 10l, m). C9ORF72 patient iMNs (n=3 patients) also showed elevated NR1 and GLUR1 levels compared to controls (n=3 controls), and forced expression of C9ORF72 isoform B reduced glutamate receptor levels in patient iMNs (n=3 patients) to that of controls (n=3 controls) (Fig. 4a-c and Supplementary Fig. 10a-h). mRNA levels of NR1 (GRIN1) and GLUR1 (GRIA1) were not elevated in flow-purified C9ORF72+/− iMNs, indicating that increased transcription could not explain the increased glutamate receptor levels (Supplementary Fig. 10n).

Lithium-brine is an important potential source of lithium. Much research and investigation has been carried out aimed at lithium recovery from brine. Although the distribution and occurrence status of lithium in brine have important implications for lithium recovery, few reports had correlated to this issue. In this article, a study was carried out to explore the lithium migration behavior during brine evaporation and KCl production process at Qarhan Salt Lake. The occurrence status of lithium both in fresh mined brine and residual brine after evaporation were also speculated by means of lithium concentration evaluation and theoretical calculation based on the Pitzer electrolyte solution theory. Results showed that, for Qarhan brine mined from the Bieletan region, most lithium was enriched in the residual brine during the brine evaporation process. The concentration of lithium in the residual brine could be more than 400 mg/L. More than 99.93% lithium ions in residual brine exist in free ions state and lithium does not precipitate from brine with a density of 1.3649 g/mL. The results also revealed that lithium concentration in wastewater discharged from KCl plants can reach a level of 243.8 mg/L. The investigation results provide a theoretical basis for comprehensive development and utilization of lithium resources in Qarhan Salt Lake.
To determine if the survival difference between C9ORF72 patient iMNs and controls was specific to our transcription factor-based reprogramming approach, we also measured the survival of Hb9::RFP+ control and C9ORF72 patient motor neurons derived from iPSCs by small molecule activation of the Sonic Hedgehog and retinoic acid signaling pathways 28 (Supplementary Fig. 3g, h). Similarly to iMNs, morphogen-generated motor neurons showed a significant survival difference between C9ORF72 patients and controls (Supplementary Fig. 3i-l).
Mice were anesthetized with i.p. ketamine (100 mg ⁄ kg) and xylazine (10 mg ⁄ kg), and body temperature kept at 36.9 ± 0.1°C with a thermostatic heating pad. Mice were placed in a stereotactic apparatus (ASI Instruments, USA) and the head is fixed accordingly. A burr hole was drilled, and an injection needle (33 gauge) was lowered into the hippocampus between CA1 and the dentate gyrus (AP −2.0, ML +1.5, DV −1.8). NMDA (20 nmol in 0.3 μl of phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4) was infused over 2 min using a micro-injection system (World Precision Instruments, Sarasota, FL, USA). Simultaneously, or independently, Apilimod (0.3 μl of 20 μM in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4) was infused over 2 min using a micro-injection system (World Precision Instruments, Sarasota, FL, USA). The needle was left in place for an additional 8 min after the injection. Animals were euthanized 48 h later. Brains were quickly removed, frozen on dry ice, and stored at −80°C until processing. Thirty-micrometer-thick coronal sections were prepared using a cryostat. Every fifth section 1 mm anterior and posterior to the site of injection was stained with cresyl violet. The lesion area was identified by the loss of staining, measured by NIH ImageJ software and integrated to obtain the volume of injury.
iMNs were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) for 1h at 4 ºC, permeabilized with 0.5% PBS-T overnight at 4 ºC, blocked with 10% FBS in 0.1% PBS-T at room temperature for 2 h, and incubated with primary antibodies at 4 ºC overnight. Cells were then washed with 0.1% PBS-T and incubated with Alexa Fluor® secondary antibodies (Life Technologies) in blocking buffer for 2 h at room temperature. To visualize nuclei, cells were stained with DAPI (Life Technologies) then mounted on slides with Vectashield® (Vector Labs). Images were acquired on an LSM 780 confocal microcope (Zeiss). The following primary antibodies were used: mouse anti-HB9 (Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank); mouse anti-TUJ1 (EMD Millipore); rabbit anti-VACHT (Sigma); rabbit anti-C9ORF72 (Sigma-Aldrich); mouse anti-EEA1 (BD Biosciences); mouse anti-RAB5 (BD Biosciences); mouse anti-RAB7 (GeneTex); mouse anti-LAMP1 (Abcam); mouse anti-LAMP3 (DSHB, cat. no. H5C6); rabbit anti-LAMP3 (Proteintech, cat. no. 12632); mouse anti-LAMP2 (DSHB, cat. no. H4B4); mouse anti-M6PR (Abcam, cat. no. Ab2733); rabbit anti-GluR1 (EMD Millipore, cat. no. pc246); mouse anti-GluR1 (Santa Cruz); rabbit anti-NR1 (EMD Millipore); mouse anti-NR1 (EMD Millipore, cat. no. MAB363); chicken anti-GFP (GeneTex).
To determine if the survival difference between C9ORF72 patient iMNs and controls was specific to our transcription factor-based reprogramming approach, we also measured the survival of Hb9::RFP+ control and C9ORF72 patient motor neurons derived from iPSCs by small molecule activation of the Sonic Hedgehog and retinoic acid signaling pathways 28 (Supplementary Fig. 3g, h). Similarly to iMNs, morphogen-generated motor neurons showed a significant survival difference between C9ORF72 patients and controls (Supplementary Fig. 3i-l).
A 241-bp digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled probe was generated from 100 ng control genomic DNA (gDNA) by PCR reaction using Q5® High-Fidelity DNA Polymerase (NEB) with primers shown in Supplementary Data Table 4. Genomic DNA was harvested from control and patient iPSCs using cell lysis buffer (100 mM Tris-HCl pH 8.0, 50 mM EDTA, 1% w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) at 55ºC overnight and performing phenol:chloroform extraction. A total of 25 µg of gDNA was digested with XbaI at 37 ºC overnight, run on a 0.8% agarose gel, then transferred to a positive charged nylon membrane (Roche) using suction by vacuum and UV-crosslinked at 120 mJ. The membrane was pre-hybridized in 25 ml DIG EasyHyb solution (Roche) for 3 h at 47 ºC then hybridized at 47 ºC overnight in a shaking incubator, followed by two 5-min washes each in 2X Standard Sodium Citrate (SSC) and in 0.1% SDS at room temperature, and two 15-min washes in 0.1x SSC and in 0.1% SDS at 68 ºC. Detection of the hybridized probe DNA was carried out as described in DIG System User’s Guide. CDP-Star® Chemilumnescent Substrate (Sigma-Aldrich) was used for detection and the signal was developed on X-ray film (Genesee Scientific) after 20 to 40 min.
To confirm that reduced C9ORF72 protein levels are sufficient to cause neurodegeneration, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to introduce a frameshift mutation into one or both alleles of C9ORF72 in control iPSCs (Fig. 2e and Supplementary Fig. 4e). qPCR showed that targeting one allele reduced C9ORF72 transcript levels due to nonsense-mediated decay and transcript levels were more severely reduced in homozygous mutant cells (Supplementary Fig. 4f). Frameshift mutations also decreased C9ORF72 protein expression (Supplementary Fig. 4g, 5c). RNA sequencing of flow-purified Hb9::RFP+ iMNs showed that targeting C9ORF72 did not significantly alter the expression of the top 10 genes with predicted off-target sites for the CRISPR guide RNA (Supplementary Fig. 4h and Supplementary Table 7). In addition, expression levels of the 20 genes nearest C9ORF72 on chromosome 9 were largely unperturbed in either the C9ORF72+/− and C9ORF72−/− iMNs, indicating that this approach specifically inactivated C9ORF72 (Supplementary Fig. 4i).
The repeat expansion suppresses the production of C9ORF72 protein by inhibiting transcription 3,4,6,7,9,17, raising the possibility that haploinsufficiency for C9ORF72 activity triggers disease pathogenesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, elimination of C9orf72 activity alters myeloid cell behavior in mice 14,18,19 and in vitro studies suggest that C9ORF72 activity may enhance autophagy 20,21.
To determine if reduced C9orf72 levels leads to glutamate receptor accumulation in vivo, we examined spinal motor neurons deleted of C9orf72 in Nestin-Cre-Stop-Flox-C9orf72 mice 22. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that Nr1 (NMDA) and GluR1 (AMPA) levels were elevated in C9orf72-null motor neurons (Supplementary Fig. 12a, b). To confirm these findings, we isolated post-synaptic densities from the spinal cords of control and C9orf72 knockout mice. Post-synaptic density fractions contained glutamate receptors and PSD-95, but not p53 or synaptophysin, indicating they were enriched for post-synaptic density proteins (Supplementary Fig. 12c, 5i). Immunoblotting showed that post-synaptic densities in C9orf72 knockout mice contained significantly higher levels of Nr1 and Glur1 than in control mice (Fig. 4i, j and Supplementary Fig. 5j).
With the four components of a chemical heat pump (two solid-gas reactors, an evaporator and a condenser), a cycle of the double-effect type can be applied to continuous refrigeration. The performance of this process is analysed, allowing the infinite sink temperature and the couples of reactive salts to be used, which depend on the production temperature envisaged, to be selected. The results are ... [Show full abstract]Read more
Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from iPSC-derived motor neurons on days 17–21 in culture in 6-well multielectrode chips (9 electrodes and 1 ground per well) using a MultiChannel Systems MEA-2100 multielectrode array (MEA) amplifier (ALA Scientific) with built-in heating elements set to 37°C. Cells were allowed to acclimate for 5 minutes after chips were placed into the MEA amplifier, and after glutamate addition (10 μM final concentration). For 1 μM Apilimod treatments, chips were incubated for 35 min in a humidified incubator in the presence of the particular drug, then returned to the MEA amplifier and acclimated for 5 min before beginning recordings. For each condition, recordings (5 min baseline, 10 min glutamate and/or drug, 40 kHz sampling rate) were filtered between 1–500 Hz, and average LFP frequency per well was determined using the accompanying MC Rack software.

With the four components of a chemical heat pump (two solid-gas reactors, an evaporator and a condenser), a cycle of the double-effect type can be applied to continuous refrigeration. The performance of this process is analysed, allowing the infinite sink temperature and the couples of reactive salts to be used, which depend on the production temperature envisaged, to be selected. The results are ... [Show full abstract]Read more
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