Base text for this translation. ___. Wang Meng’ou’s , ed. Tangren xiaoshuo jiaoshi . Taipei: Zhongzheng Shuju, 1983, 2319-38. For other texts and editions see footnote 1. Translations Birch, Cyril. “The Curly-bearded Hero,” in Anthology of Chinese Literature, v. 1, New York, 1965, pp. 314-322. Chai, Ch’u, and Winberg Chai. “The Curly-Bearded Guest,” in A Treasury of Chinese Literature, New York, 1965, pp. 117-124. Hsu Sung-nien. “Biographie d’un preux barbu,” Anthologie de la littérature chinoise.Paris: Delagrave, 1933, pp. 241-6. Levenson, Christopher, tran., The Golden Casket. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1967, pp. 137-47. Lévy, André. “Barbe-bouclée, L’étranger à la barbe et aux favoris bouclés,” in Histoires extraordinaires et récits fantastiques de la Chine ancienne.Paris: Flammarion, 1993, pp. 177-195 (with notes). Lin Yutang. “Curly-Beard,” in Famous Chinese Short Stories. New York: John Day (Cardinal), 1953, pp. 3-22. Schafer, E.H. “Three Divine Women of South China,” CLEAR, 1 (1979), pp. 31-42. Wang, Elizabeth Te-chen, tran. “The Curly-Bearded Guest,” in Wang’s Ladies of the Tang: 22 Classical Chinese Stories. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1973, pp. 133-50.
The repeat expansion suppresses the production of C9ORF72 protein by inhibiting transcription 3,4,6,7,9,17, raising the possibility that haploinsufficiency for C9ORF72 activity triggers disease pathogenesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, elimination of C9orf72 activity alters myeloid cell behavior in mice 14,18,19 and in vitro studies suggest that C9ORF72 activity may enhance autophagy 20,21.

GCaMP6 was cloned into the pMXs-Dest-WRE retroviral vector and transduced into reprogramming cultures concurrently with the motor neuron factors. To assess GCaMP6 activity, 1.5 μm glutamate was added to iMN cultures and cells were imaged continuously for 2 minutes at 24 frames per second. GFP flashes were scored manually using the video recording. At least 3 different fields of view from three independent cultures, totalling 50–100 iMNs, were scored per condition.
To determine if PIKFYVE inhibition rescued patient iMN survival by reversing phenotypic changes caused by C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency, we measured glutamate receptor levels with and without PIKFYVE inhibitor treatment. PIKFYVE inhibition significantly lowered NR1 (NMDA receptor) and GLUR1 (AMPA receptor) levels in patient (n=4 patients) and C9ORF72+/− iMNs (Supplementary Fig. 15p-s). PIKFYVE inhibition also reduced electrophysiological activity in patient motor neurons (C9-ALS1) during glutamate treatment (Supplementary Fig. 15t). To determine if small molecule inhibition of Pikfyve rescues C9ORF72 disease processes in vivo, we first established an NMDA-induced hippocampal injury model in C9orf72-deficient mice. In control mice, hippocampal injection of NMDA caused neurodegeneration after 48 hrs as we have shown previously 57 (Supplementary Fig. 17a, b). Consistent with C9orf72-deficient mice having elevated NMDA receptor levels (Fig. 4h, i and Supplementary Fig. 11a-d), injection of NMDA caused significantly greater neurodegeneration in C9orf72+/− and C9orf72−/− mice than in controls (Fig. 6g, h). Importantly, co-administration of Apilimod rescued the NMDA-induced neurodegeneration in C9orf72-deficient mice (Fig. 6g, h).
Post mortem tissues were kindly provided by Neil Shneider (Columbia) and were collected from the following individuals: Sample 1 – age: 64, diagnosis: ALS, genotype: positive for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 2 – age: 55, diagnosis: ALS, genotype: positive for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 3 – age: 65, diagnosis: ALS, genotype: positive for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 4 – age: 65, diagnosis: control, genotype: negative for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 5 – age: 50, diagnosis: control, genotype: negative for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 6 – age: 50, diagnosis: control, genotype: negative for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 7 – age: 53, diagnosis: ALS, genotype: negative for C9ORF72 repeat expansion, Sample 8 - age: 64, diagnosis: ALS, genotype: negative for C9ORF72 repeat expansion. All donors except donor 7 (sample 7) were female. For immunofluorescence, 10 µm sections were sliced from flash frozen lumbar spinal cord tissues. Sections were then air dried and fixed with ice cold acetone for 10 minutes, and blocked with 10% normal goat serum/1% BSA/0.3% Triton-X/PBS at room temperature for 1 hour followed by incubation with NR1 antibody (1:200, BD Bioscience) in blocking buffer overnight at 4 ºC. Sections subsequently were blocked using avidin/biotin kit (Vector Lab), and washed with PBS. Then, sections were incubated with goat anti-rabbit IgG Biotin conjugate secondary antibody (1:750, Invitrogen) or with goat anti-mouse IgG Biotin conjugate secondary antibody (1:750, Invitrogen) for 1 hour at room temperature, washed and incubated with streptavidin-Alexa Fluor 488 conjugate (1:500, Invitrogen) in dark for 1 hour at room temperature. Sections were washed and blocked again in blocking buffer for 1 hour at room temperature. For neuronal marker staining, sections were incubated with Tu-20 antibody (1:1000, Abcam) or NeuN antibody (1:500, Abcam) at 37 ºC for 1 hour. Sections were washed with PBS and incubated with goat anti-mouse Alexa Fluor 546 (1:500, Invitrogen) or goat anti-rabbit Alexa Fluor 546 (1:500, Invitrogen) for 1 hour at room temperature. Lipofuscin autofluorescence was quenched by immersing sections in autofluorescence eliminator reagent (Millipore) for 4 minutes following manufacture’s instruction. Sections were then counterstained and mounted with Prolong Gold antifade mounting medium with DAPI (Invitrogen).
Reprogramming was performed in 96-well plates (8 × 103 cells/well) or 13mm plastic coverslips (3.2 × 104 cells/coverslip) that were sequentially coated with gelatin (0.1%, 1 hour) and laminin (2–4 hours) at room temperature. To enable efficient expression of the transgenic reprogramming factors, iPSCs were cultured in fibroblast medium (DMEM + 10% FBS) for at least 48 hours and either used directly for retroviral transduction or passaged before transduction for each experiment. 7 iMN factors or 5 iDA factors were added in 100–200 µl fibroblast medium per 96-well well with 5 μg/ml polybrene. For iMNs, cultures were transduced with lentivirus encoding the Hb9::RFP reporter 48 hours after transduction with transcription factor-encoding retroviruses. On day 5, primary mouse cortical glial cells from P1 ICR pups (male and female) were added to the transduced cultures in glia medium containing MEM (Life Technologies), 10% donor equine serum (HyClone), 20% glucose (Sigma-Aldrich), and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. On day 6, cultures were switched to N3 medium containing DMEM/F12 (Life Technologies), 2% FBS, 1% penicillin/streptomycin, N2 and B27 supplements (Life Technologies), 7.5 µM RepSox (Selleck), and 10 ng/ml each of GDNF, BDNF, and CNTF (R&D). The iMN and iDA neuron cultures were maintained in N3 medium, changed every other day, unless otherwise noted.
Mice were anesthetized with i.p. ketamine (100 mg ⁄ kg) and xylazine (10 mg ⁄ kg), and body temperature kept at 36.9 ± 0.1°C with a thermostatic heating pad. Mice were placed in a stereotactic apparatus (ASI Instruments, USA) and the head is fixed accordingly. A burr hole was drilled, and an injection needle (33 gauge) was lowered into the hippocampus between CA1 and the dentate gyrus (AP −2.0, ML +1.5, DV −1.8). NMDA (20 nmol in 0.3 μl of phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4) was infused over 2 min using a micro-injection system (World Precision Instruments, Sarasota, FL, USA). Simultaneously, or independently, Apilimod (0.3 μl of 20 μM in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4) was infused over 2 min using a micro-injection system (World Precision Instruments, Sarasota, FL, USA). The needle was left in place for an additional 8 min after the injection. Animals were euthanized 48 h later. Brains were quickly removed, frozen on dry ice, and stored at −80°C until processing. Thirty-micrometer-thick coronal sections were prepared using a cryostat. Every fifth section 1 mm anterior and posterior to the site of injection was stained with cresyl violet. The lesion area was identified by the loss of staining, measured by NIH ImageJ software and integrated to obtain the volume of injury.
“The Tale of the Curly-Bearded Guest” 231Studies Bian, Xiaoxuan . “Lun ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de zuozhe, zuonian ji zhengzhi beijing” , in Dongnan daxue xuebao. Vol. 3, 2005, pp. 93-98. Cai, Miaozhen . “Chongtu yu jueze — ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de renweu xingge suzao ji qi yihan” in Xingda renwen xuebao . Vol. 34, 2004, pp. 153-180. Zhang, Hong . “Du Guangting ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de liuchuan yu yingxiang” in Zhongguo daojiao, vol. 1, 1997, pp. 28-31. Liu, Zhiwei . “Gujin ‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de yanjiu fansi” in Xibei daxue xuebao. Vol. 1, 2000. Sun, Yiping . Du Guangting pingzhuan. Nanjing: Nanjing daxue chubanshe, 2005. ___. “‘Qiu xu ke’ yu ‘Qiu ran ke’” in Zhongguo daojiao. vol. 6, 2005, pp. 14-17. Luo, Zhengming . Du Guangting daojiao xiaoshuo yanjiu . Chengdu: Bashu shushe, 2005. Wang, Meng’ou . “Qiuran ke yu Tang zhi chuangye chuangshuo” in Tangren xiaoshuo yanjiu siji. Taipei: Yiwen chubanshe, 1978, p. 254. Xu, Jiankun . “‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ jili jiegou xintan” in Donghai zhongwen xuebao . Vol. 11, 1994, pp. 61-72. Ye, Qingbing . “‘Qiu ran ke zhuan’ de xiezuo jiqiao” in Zhongguo gudian wenxue yanjiu congkan — Xiaoshuo zhi bu . Taipei: Juliu, 1977, pp. 167-79.
 Base text for this translation. ___. Wang Meng’ou’s , ed. Tangren xiaoshuo jiaoshi . Taipei: Zhongzheng Shuju, 1983, 2319-38. For other texts and editions see footnote 1. Translations Birch, Cyril. “The Curly-bearded Hero,” in Anthology of Chinese Literature, v. 1, New York, 1965, pp. 314-322. Chai, Ch’u, and Winberg Chai. “The Curly-Bearded Guest,” in A Treasury of Chinese Literature, New York, 1965, pp. 117-124. Hsu Sung-nien. “Biographie d’un preux barbu,” Anthologie de la littérature chinoise.Paris: Delagrave, 1933, pp. 241-6. Levenson, Christopher, tran., The Golden Casket. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1967, pp. 137-47. Lévy, André. “Barbe-bouclée, L’étranger à la barbe et aux favoris bouclés,” in Histoires extraordinaires et récits fantastiques de la Chine ancienne.Paris: Flammarion, 1993, pp. 177-195 (with notes). Lin Yutang. “Curly-Beard,” in Famous Chinese Short Stories. New York: John Day (Cardinal), 1953, pp. 3-22. Schafer, E.H. “Three Divine Women of South China,” CLEAR, 1 (1979), pp. 31-42. Wang, Elizabeth Te-chen, tran. “The Curly-Bearded Guest,” in Wang’s Ladies of the Tang: 22 Classical Chinese Stories. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1973, pp. 133-50. 

Human lymphocytes from healthy subjects and ALS patients were obtained from the NINDS Biorepository at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and reprogrammed into iPSCs as previously described using episomal vectors61. Briefly, mammalian expression vectors containing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, L-Myc, Lin28, and a p53 shRNA were introduced into the lymphocytes using the Adult Dermal Fibroblast Nucleofector™ Kit and Nucleofector™ 2b Device (Lonza) according to the manufacturer’s protocol. The cells were then cultured on mouse feeders until iPSC colonies appeared. The colonies were then expanded and maintained on Matrigel (BD) in mTeSR1 medium (Stem Cell Technologies).
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