The fabrication of composite cathode with boroxine ring for all-solid-polymer lithium cell was described. Composite polymer electrolyte (CPE) was applied between the lithium metal anode and the composite cathode in a coin-shaped cell in order to prepare the solid-polymer electrolyte cell. The CPE films were cast on a flat polytetrafluoroethylene vessel from an acetonitrile slurry containing BaTiO ... [Show full abstract]Read more
To determine if Pikfyve inhibition rescues gain-of-function processes in vivo, we measured DPR levels in C9-BAC transgenic mice 58 with or without Apilimod treatment. Although it was not previously reported 58, we observed significantly higher levels of GR+ punctae in hippocampal neurons in C9-BAC mice than controls (Fig. 6j) using a previously-validated poly(GR) antibody 11. These data are consistent with findings in another published C9-BAC mouse model 14, suggesting that poly(GR) may be a common feature of C9-BAC mice. We also detected a low level of poly(GR) in neurons from control mice (Fig. 6j), which may be derived from other repeat regions or proteins with short poly(GR) sequences. Nevertheless, GR+ punctae levels were significantly higher in C9-BAC mouse neurons than in controls (Fig. 6j). Importantly, Apilimod treatment significantly reduced the number of GR+ punctae in hippocampal neurons in C9-BAC mice after 48 hrs (Fig. 6i, j). Therefore, small molecule inhibition of Pikfyve rescues both gain- and loss-of-function disease processes induced by C9ORF72 repeat expansion in vivo.

To measure the effect of dipeptide repeat protein expression on iMN survival, PR50 and GR50 were cloned into the pHAGE lentiviral vector as fusions with GFP to allow tracking of protein expression. iMN cultures were transduced with PR50 and GR50 lentiviruses at day 17 of reprogramming and longitudinal survival analysis was started the same day. 10 ng/ml of GDNF, BDNF, and CNTF was maintained throughout the experiment, and glutamate treatment was not performed. To measure PR50 turnover, PR50 was cloned into the pHAGE lentiviral vector as a fusion with Dendra2 (Addgene). iPSC-derived fibroblasts were generated according to Daley and colleagues64. Briefly, when C9ORF72−/− iPSC cultures reached 80% confluence, the medium was switched from mTeSR1 (Stem Cell Technologies) to human fibroblast medium containing DMEM (Life Technologies), 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)(Thermo Fisher Scientific), and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (Life Technologies). Cells were passaged 2 to 3 times using Accutase (Life Technologies) before use in experiments. iPSC-derived fibroblasts were transduced with either pMXs-eGFP or pMXs-C9ORF72 isoform B-T2A-eGFP retrovirus and treated with 10 μg/ml mitomycin C for 3 hrs to inhibit cell proliferation. The cells were then transduced with the PR50–Dendra2 lentivirus and exposed to blue light for 1.5 sec using a lumencor LED light source to initiate photoconversion. The amount of decay (as a fraction of the starting level) of the red fluorescent punctae was monitored by longitudinal time lapse imaging in a Molecular Devices ImageExpress and analyzed using SVCell 2.0 (DRVision Technologies). Fluorescence was quantified at t = 0 and 12 hours after photoconversion. Distinct photoconverted punctae were treated as discrete objects for analysis (n = 20 each for +eGFP and +C9ORF72-T2A-eGFP). For each object, background fluorescence was subtracted and fluorescence was normalized according to object size. The fractional decay was statistically analyzed by two-tailed Student’s t-test. ** - p<.01.
Total RNA was extracted from sorted iMNs at day 21 post-transduction with Trizol RNA Extraction Kit (Life Technologies) and reverse transcribed with an Oligo dT primer using ProtoScript® II First Strand Synthesis Kit (NEB). RNA integrity was checked using the Experion system (Bio-Rad). Real-time PCR was performed with iTaq Universal SYBR Green Supermix (Bio-Rad) using primers shown in Supplementary Data Table 4.
Our results indicate that haploinsufficiency for C9ORF72 activity triggers neurodegeneration in C9ORF72 ALS, and this occurs by at least two mechanisms. First, reduced C9ORF72 activity causes the accumulation of glutamate receptors and excitotoxicity in response to glutamate. Although C9orf72 knockout mice do not display overt neurodegeneration14,18,22, these mice may be protected from excitotoxicity because they lack gain-of-function disease processes such as DPRs, which induce aberrant splicing and dysfunction of the EAAT2 glutamate transporter in astrocytes in vitro 12 and in C9ORF72 ALS patients 4,27. EAAT2 dysfunction causes glutamate accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid of ALS patients 27, and consistent with this notion, we found that poly(PR) expression in human astrocytes reduced their rate of glutamate uptake. By using human iMNs, mice, and human post mortem tissue, we show for the first time that reduced C9ORF72 activity modulates the vulnerability of human motor neurons to degenerative stimuli and establish a mechanistic link between the C9ORF72 repeat expansion and glutamate-induced excitotoxicity
The following antibodies were used in this manuscript: mouse anti-HB9 (Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank); 81.5C10. chicken anti-TUJ1 (EMD Millipore); AB9354. rabbit anti-VACHT (Sigma); SAB4200559. rabbit anti-C9ORF72 (Sigma-Aldrich); HPA023873. rabbit anti-C9ORF72 (Proteintech); 25757–1-AP. mouse anti-EEA1 (BD Biosciences); 610457. mouse antiRAB5 (BD Biosciences); 610281. mouse anti-RAB7 (GeneTex); GTX16196. mouse anti-LAMP1 (Abcam); ab25630. mouse anti-M6PR (Abcam); ab2733. rabbit anti-GluR1 (EMD Millipore); pc246. mouse anti-NR1 (EMD Millipore); MAB363. chicken anti-GFP (GeneTex); GTX13970. rabbit anti-Glur6/7 (EMD Millipore); 04–921. mouse anti-FLAG (Sigma); F1804. mouse anti-GAPDH (Santa Cruz); sc-32233. chicken anti-MAP2 (Abcam); ab11267, rabbit anti-GLUR1 (Millipore, cat. no. 1504), mouse anti-NR1 (Novus, cat. no. NB300118), mouse anti-Transferrin receptor (Thermo, cat. no. 136800), mouse anti-LAMP3 (DSHB, cat. no. H5C6), rabbit anti-LAMP3 (Proteintech, cat. no. 12632), mouse anti-LAMP2 (DSHB, cat. no. H4B4), goat anti-HRP (Santa Cruz, cat. no. sc-47778 HRP), mouse anti-TUJ1 (Biolegend, cat. no. MMS-435P), rabbit anti-APP (Abcam, cat. no. ab32136), mouse anti-Tau5 (Thermo, cat. no. AHB0042), mouse anti-PSD-95 (Thermo, cat. no. MA1–045), mouse anti-p53 (Cell Signaling, cat. no. 2524S), anti-mouse HRP (Cell Signaling, cat. no. 7076S), anti-rabbit HRP (Cell Signaling, cat. no. 7074S).
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