Total RNA was extracted from sorted iMNs at day 21 post-transduction with Trizol RNA Extraction Kit (Life Technologies) and reverse transcribed with an Oligo dT primer using ProtoScript® II First Strand Synthesis Kit (NEB). RNA integrity was checked using the Experion system (Bio-Rad). Real-time PCR was performed with iTaq Universal SYBR Green Supermix (Bio-Rad) using primers shown in Supplementary Data Table 4.
Previously described Nestin‐Cre+/− C9orf72loxP/loxP mice22 (18 months old) and age-matched controls (n=2 per genotype, 1 male and 1 female for C9orf72−/− and 2 males for C9orf72+/+) were transcardially perfused with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and subsequently with 4% formaldehyde. Cryoprotection occurred in 30% sucrose. Additionally, 6 month old C9-BAC and wildtype controls were transcardially perfused with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and subsequently with 4% formaldehyde. Cryoprotection occurred in 20% sucrose. After snap freezing, tissue was sectioned by cryostat at 20 µm thickness and stained with the following primary antibodies: NMDAR1, GluR1, GluR6/7, Lamp1, NeuN, Chat, and GR. Antigen retrieval by sodium citrate occurred prior to GR staining. Images were collected using a Zeiss LSM780 or LSM800 confocal microscope. Glutamate subunit intensity measurements occurred with ImageJ where the mean cytosolic intensity was divided by a background measurement collected near to the measured neuron. Lamp1 and GR quantification occurred with the help of ImageJ. The scientist performing the glutamate receptor subunit intensity, LAMP1 vesicle, and GR quantification was blinded to the genotypes or treatment of the samples.
During lysosomal biogenesis, lysosomal proteins are transported in Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor (M6PR)+ vesicles from the trans-Golgi Network to early and late endosomes for eventual incorporation into lysosomes 41. Disruption of M6PR+ vesicle trafficking can lead to a reduction in lysosome numbers 42 and altered localization of M6PR+ vesicles 43. In control iMNs (n=3 controls), M6PR+ vesicles were distributed loosely around the perinuclear region and to a lesser extent in the non-perinuclear cytosol (Supplementary Fig. 9a, b). In contrast, C9ORF72 patient (n=4 patients), C9ORF72+/−, and C9ORF72−/− iMNs frequently harbored densely-packed clusters of M6PR+ vesicles (Supplementary Fig. 9a, b). This was not due to a reduced number of M6PR+ vesicles in patient and C9ORF72-deficient iMNs (Supplementary Fig. 9c). Forced expression of C9ORF72 isoform B restored normal M6PR+ vesicle localization in patient (n=4 patients) and C9ORF72-deficient iMNs, confirming that a lack of C9ORF72 activity induced this phenotype (Supplementary Fig. 9a, b).
Near the cities Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, and Jinan, Wuqiao County has many transportation connections. There are many rail and bus services operating in the town. Wuqiao was the first Chinese city to open up its doors to the world under the "Open Door" policy and over many years development, Wuqiao has become a flourishing city with a favorable investment environment.[citation needed]
To determine if the survival difference between C9ORF72 patient iMNs and controls was specific to our transcription factor-based reprogramming approach, we also measured the survival of Hb9::RFP+ control and C9ORF72 patient motor neurons derived from iPSCs by small molecule activation of the Sonic Hedgehog and retinoic acid signaling pathways 28 (Supplementary Fig. 3g, h). Similarly to iMNs, morphogen-generated motor neurons showed a significant survival difference between C9ORF72 patients and controls (Supplementary Fig. 3i-l).
On the other hand, the level of the Neijing force depends on the extent one can exercise over one's will power to release an inner qi energy. Within the framework of Chinese martial arts, every person is believed to possess the inborn energy of qi. Martial artists can harness the force of qi so that it is strong enough to be applied in combat. When qi is being directed by one's will, it is called Neijing.[4]
(a) Super-resolution microscopy images of control iMNs showing colocalization (arrows) of C9ORF72 (green) with EEA1 (red). Scale bar: 5 µm. This experiment was repeated 3 times with similar results. (b) Immunoblot against C9ORF72, EEA1, and LAMP1 on lysates from iPSC-derived motor neurons separated into light (endosomal) and heavy (lysosomal) membrane fractions using percoll gradient centrifugation. This experiment was repeated twice with similar results. (c) Super-resolution microscopy images of LAMP1 immunostaining in iMNs of specified genotypes expressing eGFP or C9ORF72 (isoform A or B)-eGFP. Scale bar: 5 µm. This experiment was repeated 3 times with similar results. (d-f) Number of LAMP1+ vesicles in control (d-f), patient (d), C9ORF72+/− (e), and C9ORF72−/− (f) iMNs overexpressing eGFP or C9ORF72 (isoform A or B)-eGFP. Each grey open circle represents a single iMN, Mean ± s.d. For (d), n=80 (CTRL + GFP), 80 (C9-ALS + GFP), 64 (C9-ALS + isoA), and 61 (C9-ALS + isoB) iMNs quantified from two biologically independent iMN conversions of 3 CTRL or 4 C9-ALS lines. For (e), n=20 (CTRL + GFP), 15 (C9ORF72+/− + GFP), 12 (C9ORF72+/− + isoA), and 13 (C9ORF72+/− + isoB) iMNs f quantified from two biologically independent iMN conversions per condition. For (f), n=20 iMNs quantified from two biologically independent iMN conversions per condition. One-way ANOVA with Tukey correction between CTRL2 and C9ORF72+/− and C9ORF72−/− (e, f), one-way ANOVA with Tukey correction between controls and patient conditions (d). F-value (DFn, DFd): (3, 273)=12.12 (d), (3, 57)=5.64 (e), (3, 77)=6.091 (f). Dotted lines outline iMNs. (g) Representative electron micrographs of control, C9ORF72−/−, and patient iMNs showing lysosomes as electron-dense spherical perinuclear structures (arrows). This experiment was repeated twice with similar results. Scale bar: 1 μm. (h-i) Number of electron-dense spheres per square micron of perinuclear cytosol in control (h-i), C9ORF72−/− (h), and patient iMNs (i) Median ± interquartile range, each data point represents a single cell, Two-sided Mann-Whitney test). For (h), n=20 (CTRL2) and 19 (C9ORF72+/−), and for (i) n=20 (CTRL2) and 26 (C9ORF72 patient) cells quantified from two biologically independent iMN conversions of one line per genotype. (j) Super-resolution microscopy images of Lamp1 immunoreactivity in control and C9-KO mouse spinal neurons. This experiment was repeated twice with similar results. Scale bar: 5 μm. (k) Number of Lamp1+ punctae in Chat+ mouse spinal neurons. Median ± interquartile range, two-tailed t-test. t-value: 3.681. Degrees of freedom: 113. n=59 (CTRL2) and 56 (C9ORF72−/−) cells quantified from sections of two mice per genotype.
IPSC-MNs at differentiation D35 were harvested in cold Hypotonic buffer (20 mM HEPES pH 7.4, 10 mM KCl, 2 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EDTA, 1mM EGTA, 1 mM DTT and protease inhibitor cocktail (Roche)) and lysed by passing through G25 needles 25 times and then spun down at 700 x g for 10min at 4℃. The Supernatant was loaded onto pre-made 30% Percoll solution and re-centrifuged at 33,000 RPM using Beckman rotor SWI55 for 50min at 4℃. 300 ul aliquots were taken from top to bottom as fractions and all the collected samples were boiled with SDS-PAGE sample buffer and analyzed by western blot.
Removal of TTX and TEA during glutamate receptor agonist treatment revealed additional increases in Gcamp6 activation in C9ORF72+/− iMNs compared to controls, suggesting that C9ORF72+/− iMNs also fire action potentials more frequently than controls (Supplementary Fig. 13a), although we did not detect large changes in sodium or potassium current amplitudes in C9ORF72+/− iMNs (Supplementary Fig. 13b, c). To determine if increased neuronal activity due in part to elevated glutamate receptor levels contributes to neurodegeneration in C9ORF72 patient and C9ORF72+/− iMNs, we measured iMN survival in the presence or absence of retigabine. Retigabine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of epilepsy and reduces neuronal excitability by activating Kv7 potassium channels 48. In the glutamate treatment assay, retigabine increased the survival of C9ORF72 patient (n=2 patients) and C9ORF72-deficient iMNs, but not controls (n=2 controls)(Supplementary Fig. 13d-g).
Previously described Nestin‐Cre+/− C9orf72loxP/loxP mice22 (18 months old) and age-matched controls (n=2 per genotype, 1 male and 1 female for C9orf72−/− and 2 males for C9orf72+/+) were transcardially perfused with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and subsequently with 4% formaldehyde. Cryoprotection occurred in 30% sucrose. Additionally, 6 month old C9-BAC and wildtype controls were transcardially perfused with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and subsequently with 4% formaldehyde. Cryoprotection occurred in 20% sucrose. After snap freezing, tissue was sectioned by cryostat at 20 µm thickness and stained with the following primary antibodies: NMDAR1, GluR1, GluR6/7, Lamp1, NeuN, Chat, and GR. Antigen retrieval by sodium citrate occurred prior to GR staining. Images were collected using a Zeiss LSM780 or LSM800 confocal microscope. Glutamate subunit intensity measurements occurred with ImageJ where the mean cytosolic intensity was divided by a background measurement collected near to the measured neuron. Lamp1 and GR quantification occurred with the help of ImageJ. The scientist performing the glutamate receptor subunit intensity, LAMP1 vesicle, and GR quantification was blinded to the genotypes or treatment of the samples.

Yingxiao Shi,#1,2,3 Shaoyu Lin,#1,2,3 Kim A. Staats,1,2,3 Yichen Li,1,2,3 Wen-Hsuan Chang,1,2,3 Shu-Ting Hung,1,2,3 Eric Hendricks,1,2,3 Gabriel R. Linares,1,2,3 Yaoming Wang,3,4 Esther Y. Son,5 Xinmei Wen,6 Kassandra Kisler,3,4 Brent Wilkinson,3 Louise Menendez,1,2,3 Tohru Sugawara,1,2,3 Phillip Woolwine,1,2,3 Mickey Huang,1,2,3 Michael J. Cowan,1,2,3 Brandon Ge,1,2,3 Nicole Koutsodendris,1,2,3 Kaitlin P. Sandor,1,2,3 Jacob Komberg,1,2,3 Vamshidhar R. Vangoor,7 Ketharini Senthilkumar,7 Valerie Hennes,1,2,3 Carina Seah,1,2,3 Amy R. Nelson,3,4 Tze-Yuan Cheng,8 Shih-Jong J. Lee,8 Paul R. August,9 Jason A. Chen,10 Nicholas Wisniewski,10 Hanson-Smith Victor,10 T. Grant Belgard,10 Alice Zhang,10 Marcelo Coba,3,11 Chris Grunseich,12 Michael E. Ward,12 Leonard H. van den Berg,13 R. Jeroen Pasterkamp,7 Davide Trotti,6 Berislav V. Zlokovic,3,4 and Justin K. Ichida1,2,3,†
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