I’ve spent the last 2 years doing a lot of resumes and LinkedIn profiles for job seekers. I’ve also done a lot of biographies and social media marketing copy and consulting for coaches, authors and other solo business owners along the way. But now I’m leveraging my last two years of experiences (all of which were paying gigs, so no need to smack my pen out of my hand, LOL!) and I am positioning myself to expand and work with bigger companies like my first one.
While successful content writers seem to have an enviable life -- they work from home, make their own schedules and work as much or as little as they please -- the vast majority have a hard time making a living of it. They lack the skills necessary to succeed. Because no matter how talented they are, writing skill is simply not enough. So, if you want to become successful as a content writer, you need a full toolkit of marketable skills.
I am a internet marketing executive so I was looking around for some stuffs which can help us define if the content is good or not. I came around your posts and thankfully got some good clues or copy writing which can help a content writer. This learning can help me too to check whether our content writer is skilled enough to write the content or not. Thanks.
I was 15 when started blogging about politics and education, then at college I started to write essay per week + two reflections (300words each)/week,. Then I gradually became obsessed about copywriting, mainly thanks to you Neville (I honestly have no idea how have I discovered you), then I got to list building , and every other possible online marketing thing.
It can help, but other degrees also have content writing value. For instance, the ability to synthesize and relate complex information is key to content writing, but can also be acquired from studies in education or philosophy. Companies that offer content writing positions tend to find it easier to train someone in a complex topic than to train someone to write, however. For example, as a healthcare professional with mediocre writing skills, you're less likely to be hired as a healthcare content writer than a strong writer with no healthcare background (but who can be trained in healthcare topics).

While successful content writers seem to have an enviable life -- they work from home, make their own schedules and work as much or as little as they please -- the vast majority have a hard time making a living of it. They lack the skills necessary to succeed. Because no matter how talented they are, writing skill is simply not enough. So, if you want to become successful as a content writer, you need a full toolkit of marketable skills.
Customize your resume and cover letter. If you decide to go a more traditional route and apply for a permanent content writing position at a writing based agency or organization, you will need to customize your resume and cover letter to fit the position. This will show your employer that you noted the skills outlined in the job posting and that you can fulfill the expectations of the position.
I like the suggestions posed here and am going to give them a shot. I’ve written the copy I like most (and think is most concise and effective) when I stop thinking about what I’m trying to do and just write then go back and see what I came up with that I like and truncate/refine. I’ll even write the same sentence three different ways in succession as I think of different ways.
It’s that, for most of us, the idea of selling something is already unnerving. Who wants to come across as a slimy salesperson? Plus, with writing, there’s a delay between copy being created and the other person reading it. You’re vulnerable without the luxury of self-correcting based on that person’s body language. You have to release your words into the ether and hope that someone receives it and acts upon it.
“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”
The emotional responses you can try to provoke will depend on what you’re offering and the desired effect you want this emotional reaction to have on your prospects. Negative emotions, such as anger, disgust, and fear can provoke an incredibly powerful response in the reader, but it can be a challenge to balance this reaction with the rest of your messaging—you don’t want the negative emotional reaction to carry over into perceptions of your products or brand.
Take a content writing class online. Some professional content writers argue that academic programs may be too basic or general for individuals who already have some writing experience or an existing English degree. If you feel you are already a skillful writer, you will likely need technical writing skills that you can gain through a content writing class online.[7]
If I were Forest Gump, then writing would be like my Jenny. Always in and out of my life in some form or another, and just when I think she’s gone for good, there she is floating across a field to me as if in a dream. And when she appears, she always affects me in some good way. Writing for me is like a tiger in a cage, pacing constantly looking for a way to get out and do what God put it here on earth to do, kill. I cut my literary teeth on Stephen King, but I don’t see myself writing blood and guts books. Instead I have an idea for a book that has been done many times over. I have a couple of models in 1/18th scale die cast metal, that when I look at them, all I can think of is being three inches tall and being able to drive them. For years I have tried to weave a story around this image, and it shouldn’t be that hard, but other factors are involved. Your words are encouraging and inspirational. I think I will start hacking out something I can call my own work of art, because like they say, which includes you too by the way, to be a writer you must write. So thank you for helping me get started. And if you have time, you could shoot me a gmail, it would be an honor. Thanks again Bryan Fitzpatrick Thompson
I notice that you have Ben Settle on the list here. I enjoyed your radio show with him not too long ago, and I have used the templates he provided from one of his guest posts here. But I can also say that Ben as good a copywriter as Ben is -especially his email writing expertise- he’s just as effective at teaching HOW to write emails that sell. I recommend his monthly print newsletter called Email Players.
A lot of writers in the industry sell themselves short because they don’t know how much people would really be willing to pay them. That, and also because of mental blockages that make you feel unworthy of charging what you want. This course will smash those barriers, giving you a surge of confidence to immediately increase your rates well above industry averages.
Hi Neville, I’ve been poking around on your website for the last hour or so… great stuff, and I’ve been doing this (writing copy) for nigh on 25 years. I’d like to republish one of your articles in my weekly copywriting e-letter, the Copywriter’s Roundtable (link above, along with my email). I’ll look around for your contact info, but in case I don’t find it… how can we get in touch?
It is common for an advertising copywriter to specialize within a particular industry or medium. Many Internet copywriters provide freelance services to different companies and websites, creating banner ads and short articles that are placed on other online sites. An advertising copywriter may focus on creating material for printed publications, such as magazines, newspapers, signs, banners, and billboards. Finally, some advertising copywriters specialize in creating scripts and scenes for television commercials, radio spots, and movie trailers.

Low pay. Most content writing positions do not pay well, especially entry level writing positions. Small newspapers or publications are often good places to start in terms of gaining experience and contacts. But often, the compensation will be $10-$12 an hour.[2] The average salary for content writers in the United States is $40,000 a year. Higher paying positions in the content writing field include project managers, online researchers, and proposal writers. However, you will need higher levels of experience to qualify for these positions.[3]


I’ve been reading your articles for the past year, and it really has changed the way I approach copy, especially when crafting emails. I, too, have a swipe folder (bwuahahaha), and after reading this article, I consider myself a triple threat (copywriter with 2 years working in a marketing department… ex-medical assistant, barista, and IT person). Either way, I’m always reading, sharing, and generally enjoying your blog. Well played, sir!
I have just started a business writing resumés and job applications and doing interview coaching. I got my first client through a friend at work who is also my hairdresser. I helped her with some job applications and she recommended me to a customer (cut, foils, blow dry!) who paid me $200 to write responses to selection criteria for a government job. It took me ages to do this but I learned a lot and it gave me the confidence to keep going.
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