Marketing copywriters prepare creative and persuasive copy to urge consumers to purchase a client's goods or services. Copy is used in several media vehicles, including television, print and radio. Prospective marketing copywriters should seek a bachelor's degree in communications, English, journalism, advertising or marketing. In addition, examples of previous writing or completion of an internship program can be beneficial. Marketing copywriters should also be knowledgeable about their employer's industry, services and/or product line.

Consider the shipping time for an online purchase. During the purchase process (i.e., an immediate event), customers will be focused on numerals. So you should minimize those numbers (e.g., 1-3 weeks). Afterward, when customers are waiting for the delivery (i.e., a distant event), they’ll be focused on units. So you should minimize the units (e.g., 7-21 days).


There are just 3 simple principles to writing good copy.  "Copy" in this instance means anything written by you or your company which is meant to attract customers to your business. The same 3 principles apply whether you are trying to increase donations to your non-profit, trying to convince people you are the best doctor in town, or working hard to sell someone your product.
To "burnish" means to rub something to a shine or gloss.  It's not enough to slap some words down and hit the Send button!  Take to heart the famous writing adage: "There is no great writing, there is only great re-writing."  By the time you read these words, I will have tweaked them at least four times, checking for better and stronger ways to convey my message to you. I will double-triple checking for poor grammar or typos.  After that, the editors at Entrepreneur.com will do it again - twice!  Especially if English isn't your strong suit, write the first draft and then have it checked out by someone else.  There's no shame in using an editor or editing yourself. Ideally, set your words aside for 24 hours and read them again before you send them off into the world.

The subject line is what gets your e-mail opened, so don't write something quickly just before sending. You have to convince your readers that they really need to open your e-mail. The best word you can use to get the reader's attention is you. The word you says that the message is about them. Other great words for subject lines (and headlines) include new, exciting, exclusive and introducing. Also, try to keep your subject line to 50 characters or less, including spaces.


Most product descriptions on e-commerce websites are full of mumbo jumbo. You’re already doing better than most if not each description is mumbo jumbo. 🙂 Most of us get tired of writing product descriptions after some time, and that’s when the mumbo jumbo sneaks in, because we can’t think of anything else to say anymore. Try not to write one category in one go, but jump around from category to category. That usually helps to keep it fresh. 🙂
It can help, but other degrees also have content writing value. For instance, the ability to synthesize and relate complex information is key to content writing, but can also be acquired from studies in education or philosophy. Companies that offer content writing positions tend to find it easier to train someone in a complex topic than to train someone to write, however. For example, as a healthcare professional with mediocre writing skills, you're less likely to be hired as a healthcare content writer than a strong writer with no healthcare background (but who can be trained in healthcare topics).
Are you writing email marketing copy that’s just not getting the conversions you need? Getting your email marketing strategy right is both an art and a science. Part of both is understanding how to create high-converting copy. The good news is that by the time you’ve finished reading this guide, you’ll know the secrets of improving conversions from email marketing so that you can get more leads and sales.
Content marketing attracts prospects and transforms prospects into customers by creating and sharing valuable free content. Content marketing helps companies create sustainable brand loyalty, provides valuable information to consumers, and creates a willingness to purchase products from the company in the future. This relatively new form of marketing does not involve direct sales. Instead, it builds trust and rapport with the audience.[2]

Exceptionally well researched and factual write up. This is true quality and value for all on the internet. Frankly, all of us need as much “back up” and study as possible to do our job – creating true value for our customers. Imagine the energy of writing truly original and compelling copy. I don’t intend to sell you anything. This process saves time in producing good copy the first time. It saves trouble in doing it right the first time. We all reach our objective of transferring true value to our clients. All for the very small price in time and effort to study and replicate these principles. Imagine doing it wrong – it really takes less time to just slap something down and move on doesn’t it? This is for you, it is free once you learn it, because you want to make the sale. This will capture the clients instantly with a new product or concept for their trouble. Imagine the excitement of finally becoming persuasive and capable of delivering on your promises. What do you think I will do next? Just like a professor in front of an adoring student, understanding the value of these principals will deliver time and again. Thanks for your grand post!
With the pace of social media and the frequency of blogging, not to mention that many of your content assets will be used across multiple campaigns and teams, a lightweight project management tool is critical. I recommend using a free software called Trello, which helps you organize your content, set deadlines, attach files, and collaborate with multiple teammates. Another great tool for keeping content projects organized from planning to publishing is Zerys -- a content marketing tool with a built-in marketplace of professional writers. 

There are a host of metrics to look at when you have a robust analytics solution, but having too many goals to live up to tends to result in prioritization difficulties. I recommend content marketing teams have 2-3 metrics they measure, and perhaps some secondary metrics each sub-team can measure to help understand when there are different levers to pull. Here are my recommendations:
Notice how the second sentence is somehow less exciting (even though it contains a killer lion?) That;s because the active voice emphasizes the action with “the lion attacked.” In the passive voice, the village is the subject. The agent (the lion that performed the action) is only mentioned afterwards using the prepositional phrase “by the lion.” It’s almost an afterthought. 
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